Support

We pride ourselves on providing World-Class Service to our customers. Our large in-house support staff undergoes weeks of training to ensure that we provide honest, clear cut, answers to your questions. We never outsource this service, which means you'll be talking to a Capital Bankcard employee who knows your account and understands your business. We are the best in the business and our team will do whatever it takes to keep you up and running and satisfied.

Should you need additional assistance, please feel free to contact us directly.  We are available to assist you Monday to Friday, 8:00am to 12:00am EST. 

Frequently Asked Questions

+What is CSP and why is it important? And, when I will be charged?

The Compliance Services Package is a standard component of our merchant services offerings. The PCI Security Standards Council mandates PCI compliance for all merchants accepting credit and debit card payments and our Compliance Services Package is designed to provide you with the tools and resources to achieve compliance and add protection for your business. Unlike the majority of our competitors we offer increased protection for our merchants beyond the standard PCI compliance assistance including:

  • Breach Protection: Should you experience a monetary fine associated with a breach to your merchant services data and you can confirm that you are/were PCI compliant at the time of the breach; you will be credited up to a maximum of $10,000.
  • Chargeback Protection: Merchants will be reimbursed for any transaction chargeback fees incurred up to a maximum of $25 per occurrence for up to two (2) occurrences per calendar year.
  • PCI Compliance: Capital Bankcard, through its partnership with ControlScan, provides an easy way to become compliant. ControlScan guides you through the compliance process, beginning with a self-assessment questionnaire. Our partnership is designed to support you with personalized guidance and support to achieve PCI compliance and maintain it as well.

CSP Billing Capital Bankcard customers are on an annual CSP payment cycle receiving one annual charge of $79, which will be assessed in either April or December of each calendar year.

+How do I update my bank account information?

Please download and fill out this form, and return it to us via fax or e-mail as per the form's instructions. You will need to provide to us a voided check for the new account in order for this change to be made. If you do not have a new check, you can provide us with a letter from your bank on their letterhead, detailing the name on the checking account, the routing number and the account number. This letter must be signed by a bank officer. Once we receive your new account information, the bank account will be updated in 3 business days. You will receive an e-mail confirmation when the change is completed. Please be aware that any transactions that are batched out prior to the change being made will continue to go into the current bank account on file, so please do not close that account until the change has been made.

+I recently moved my business. How do I update my terminal to print the correct address?

Please download and fill out this form, and return it to us via fax or e-mail as per the form's instructions. Please let us know if this new address is for both your physical location and your mailing address where you would like to receive your statements and any other notices from us. We will update this in our system within 3 business days, and after that point you can contact our 24/7 terminal support line to update the address in your terminal. The terminal support line can be reached at 877.788.2836. Make sure to have your merchant account number available when you call them.

+How do I update my legal corporate information?

Please download and fill out this form, and return it to us via fax or e-mail with supporting documentation as per the form's instructions. Once we receive your information back, these changes take 5 – 6 business days to complete and must go through credit approval. You will receive an e-mail confirmation once the change is complete.

+What is a chargeback?

A chargeback occurs when a customer or issuing bank disputes a charge from the merchant. For example, if a customer believed they were over-charged for an item and contacted their bank to dispute the charge.

If you have any questions about chargebacks, call our dedicated chargeback team at 1.800.672.5007.

Important: If you want to dispute a chargeback, you must follow the instructions on the chargeback notification.  Capital Bankcard cannot formally dispute a chargeback on your behalf, even if the cause is a technical issue.

The chargeback process

The chargeback process is split into four stages:

  • First chargeback
  • Second presentment
  • Second chargeback and pre-arbitration
  • Arbitration

First chargeback

  1. Customer complains to their bank about a charge. Customers have 12 months to dispute a charge on a MasterCard transactions, and 18 months to dispute a charge on a Visa transaction. This time-frame can change, depending on the reason for the chargeback.
  2. Bank sends the dispute to the processor.
  3. Processor pulls the funds from the merchant's bank account and holds them in escrow or in a non-interest bearing account.
  4. Processor sends a letter to the merchant advising of the dispute and asking for documents to support the merchant's defense of the dispute. The merchant has 15 calendar days to respond, from the date the processor sends the letter. 
Note: The merchant should include their business telephone number on the transaction receipt that they send with their response.

Second presentment

  1. The merchant sends documents supporting the charge to the processor. Examples of documents which may support a charge include the following:
    • Proof of purchase
    • Proof of delivery
    • Proof of address
    • Any communication with the cardholder
    • Signed contracts
  2. The processor makes a decision about the chargeback. If it decides in favor of the merchant, the funds are put back into the merchant's bank account within five days; if it decides in favor of the customer, the funds are put back on the customer's card.

Second chargeback and pre-arbitration

If the situation escalates to this stage, and the merchant still disagrees with the cardholder and their issuing bank, they must file for arbitration.

Arbitration

If the cardholder/bank and merchant can't resolve the dispute, they can present their cases to a Visa/MasterCard analyst for a decision. Arbitration costs money for both the customer/bank and the merchant. 

Next steps

+How does EMV protect me against chargebacks?

One of the best things you can do to reduce your chargeback risk, is to invest in EMV-enabled hardware. It is much harder for fraudsters to skim and duplicate EMV cards because of the nature of the cards, and because of how EMV transactions are processed. With chargebacks related to EMV transactions, you can provide:

  • Documentation supporting that the transaction was made using an EMV terminal, but was processed on a card that does not use chip and PIN
  • Documentation supporting that the transaction was processed using a device that prefers chip and PIN cards, on a card that does not use chip and PIN
  • Proof of when a chip fault results in a fallback transaction
  • Proof that your terminal is able to accept chip cards
+How long should I keep transaction documentation?

You should keep your transaction documentation for the following amounts of time:

  • Visa and MasterCard: 13 months
  • HealthCare transactions: Five years
  • Discover and American Express: Two years
+What is a retrieval request?

A retrieval request is the process of a card issuer requesting transaction information from a merchant. This may be to satisfy a cardholder’s need, or to support a chargeback right. The request is non-financial; however not fulfilling the request could result in a chargeback.

Each retrieval request has a request code which identifies why the issuer initiated the request.

If you have any questions about retrieval requests, call our dedicated team at 1.800.672.5007.

Important: You must fulfill a retrieval request and return it to First Data within 20 calendar days. This is to make sure that the card issuer receives the fulfilment on time.
+What should I do when I receive a retrieval request?

When you receive a retrieval request, you should provide all available documentation to support the transaction. The documentation should relate to the reason stated on the retrieval request, and be returned by the date listed on the request.

Important: If you do not respond on time, or your response is inaccurate, the retrieval request may result in a chargeback with no re-presentment rights. It may also cause a compliance violation.

Documentation may include, but not be limited to, copies of:

  • Sales draft
  • Folio
  • Rental agreement
  • Any other documentation that you have kept

Documentation requirements

Documentation should:

  • Be clear and legible
  • Correspond with the correct retrieval request
  • Include the retrieval case number on each page
Note: Documents should contain all the elements required by your industry. For example, sales drafts must meet the minimum requirements listed later in this article.

Response requirements

Your response should:

  • Be provided before the due date listed on the original notification
  • Include the original notification, as well as the retrieval case number
Note: If you send multiple responses, only the first response is used to fulfill the request.

Sales draft minimum requirements:

  • Account number
  • Expiration date
  • Merchant name and location
  • Transaction amount
  • Transaction date
  • Description of merchandise or service
  • Ship to address (if applicable)
  • Authorization code (if available)
  • Cardholder name (if available)
Note: Sales drafts that contain a cardholder signature must include the details of the transaction on the same document, in order to link the transaction with the signature. This also applies to signature-capture receipts.
+How can I defend myself against chargebacks?

If you receive a chargeback you should:

  • Follow the instructions on the chargeback notification
  • Respond by the due date listed on the notification
  • Provide a written reply addressing all of the cardholder’s concerns
  • Provide copies of all transaction documents, including, but not limited to:
    • Order forms
    • Invoices
    • Contracts
  • Respond to all retrieval requests on time and provide accurate information
Note: Do not issue credit to an account when you receive a chargeback as the card issuer applies a conditional credit to the cardholder’s account. Any credit you issue after you have received a chargeback, may not be recoverable. You may be financially responsible for the credit, and the chargeback.
Important: The card issuer may reverse the chargeback if the information is sufficient. Chargeback reversals are conditional, as the card issuer may investigate the case further, by processing a second chargeback or pre-arbitration case.

Evidence of cardholder actions

Important: You must provide compelling evidence that the cardholder took part in the transaction.

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

  • Cardholder’s awareness that they purchased merchandise in “as is” condition, for example:
    • Signed disclosure
    • Screen print for e-commerce
  • Letter from cardholder admitting that they purchased merchandise “as is”
  • Cardholder’s non-compliance with a clearly documented cancellation policy, return policy, or applicable law

Evidence of your actions

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

  • One or more undisputed payments for the same merchandise or service
  • You issued credit to the account to correct an error
  • Multiple fraudulent transactions did not occur, including:
    • Transaction documents
    • A written rebuttal explaining the multiple transactions
    • Pointing out differences between transactions such as:
      • Two different clerks
      • Times of transactions
      • Checkout lanes
      • Different merchandise purchased
  • Services were rendered
  • You attempted to repair or replace goods, or provide replacement services

You should also provide a legible copy of the transaction documentation to assist the cardholder in recognizing the transaction.

Additional actions for different merchant types

As well as the actions described, you can also provide additional information for different transaction types. For more information about each merchant type, go to the following individual pages:

+What additional information can a keyed-entry or MOTO merchant provide to defend against chargebacks?

In addition to the actions described in How can I defend myself against chargebacks?, keyed-entry or MOTO merchants can also provide the additional information as listed here.

Evidence of cardholder actions

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

  • Person who signed for the merchandise was authorized to sign on behalf of the cardholder, or is known by the cardholder
  • Release form or waiver signed by the cardholder that allows packages to be delivered to the cardholder’s address without requiring a signature, and provide an unsigned Proof of Delivery (POD)
  • Cardholder agreed to accept the merchandise or services as provided
  • Pickups:
    • Cardholder signature on the pick-up form
    • Copy of identification presented by the cardholder
    • Details of identification presented by the cardholder
  • Deliveries to a business address:
    • Merchandise was delivered to the address—a signature is NOT required as evidence of delivery
    • At the time of delivery, the cardholder was working for the company at the delivery address, for example:
      • Confirmation the cardholder was listed as a director of the company
      • Cardholder email address with the company’s domain name

Evidence of your actions

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

  • Written correspondence between you and the cardholder, including:
    • Letters
    • Emails
    • Photographs
    • Faxes
    • Any other written correspondence
  • Imprinted transaction receipt
  • Shipping date, if the merchandise is in the process of being shipped
  • You shipped the merchandise to a positive AVS address and obtained Proof of Delivery (POD)
    • Domestic only—signed POD may be required to assist with resolving the chargeback
  • Delivery, or evidence that the goods or services were delivered as directed by the customer
  • Shipping and delivery of any replacement merchandise
  • Explanation of any differences when transaction dates, merchant name, or merchant location differ
+What additional information can an e-commerce merchant provide to defend against chargebacks?

In addition to the actions described in How can I defend myself against chargebacks?, e-commerce merchants can also provide the additional information as listed here.

Evidence of cardholder actions

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

  • Transaction was completed by a member of the cardholder’s household
  • Transaction used data that had been used in a previously undisputed transaction, for example:
    • IP address
    • Email address
    • Physical address
    • Telephone number
  • Transaction history for registered online users including, for example,
    • Device type
    • IP address
    • Time and date of purchase
  • Cardholder accessed your website after the transaction date
  • Digital delivery:
    • The cardholder’s email address used at the time of purchase matches the email address used to deliver digital goods
  • Site-to-store delivery, card not present:
    • Cardholder signature on the pick-up form
    • Copy of cardholder identification
  • Release form or waiver signed by the cardholder that allows packages to be delivered to the cardholder’s address without requiring a signature, and provide an unsigned Proof of Delivery (POD)
  • Cardholder agreed to accept the merchandise or services as provided
  • Direct connection between the cardholder and the person who received the merchandise or services, for example:
    • Photographs
    • Emails
  • Cardholder disputing the transaction has the merchandise or is using the service, for example:
    • Photographs
    • Emails

Evidence of your actions

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

  • Verified by Visa was used
  • Written correspondence between you and the cardholder, including:
    • Letters
    • Emails
    • Photographs
    • Faxes
    • Any other written correspondence
  • Invoice or Proof of Delivery (POD) showing that merchandise was shipped before cancellation and has not been returned
  • You shipped the merchandise to a positive AVS address and obtained Proof of Delivery (POD)
    • Domestic only—signed POD may be required to assist with resolving the chargeback
  • Delivery, or evidence that the goods or services were delivered as directed by the customer
  • Shipping and delivery of any replacement merchandise
  • Explanation of any differences when transaction dates, merchant name, or merchant location differ
+What additional information can a retail merchant provide to defend against chargebacks?

In addition to the actions described in How can I defend myself against chargebacks?, retail merchants can also provide the additional information as listed here.

  • Signed, magnetic swipe or imprinted transaction receipt
  • Documentation that the issuer authorized the transaction as a result of a technical fallback
+What additional information can a recurring billing or service-based merchant provide to defend against chargebacks?

In addition to the actions described in How can I defend myself against chargebacks? article, recurring billing or service-based merchants can also provide the additional information as listed here.

Evidence of cardholder actions

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

  • Signed contract which states the terms under which the cardholder may cancel the service
    • Cardholder did not provide proof that they canceled under the terms laid out in the contract
  • For recurring transactions:
    • Cardholder is using the merchandise or services
    • Cardholder canceled within the same month as billing, and partial services were rendered
    • Cardholder did not attempt to cancel the services
    • Transaction date occurred before the cancelation date, or the cancelation occurred on the same day as the transaction

Evidence of your actions

If applicable, you should provide evidence of the following:

For recurring transactions:

  • Legally binding contract between you and the cardholder
  • A previous, undisputed transaction
  • You issued credit before the chargeback—if the cardholder did cancel the service
  • Rebuttal stating:
    • Cardholder canceled in the middle or at the end of a billing cycle
    • You bill in arrears, after services are rendered
    • Transaction date occurred before the cancelation date, or the cancelation occurred on the same day as the transaction
+What is a fallback transaction?

A fallback transaction happens when the cardholder inserts a chip card into an EMV compliant device, but there is a fault with the chip. The device cannot read the chip, but allows the cardholder to complete the transaction using the magnetic stripe on the card.

Note: Because the device is EMV ready, and there was an attempt to process using the chip, the merchant does not take on liability for that transaction.
+How can I avoid chargebacks?

You can avoid chargebacks by using the following best practices:

Do:

  • Obtain the cardholder’s signature to confirm they received the merchandise in good condition
  • Be careful when manually keying an account number for approval to prevent keying errors
  • Obtain another form of payment if you receive a “Decline” response
  • Confirm you received valid authorization before processing all transactions
  • Confirm all your employees understand your authorization processing procedures, including voice authorization requirements
  • Ensure your merchant descriptor matches the name of your business, and displays correctly on the cardholder’s statement
  • Implement internal fraud prevention policies and procedures for suspicious activity
  • Issue credits to cardholders as needed and in a timely manner
  • Process all transactions in the proper currency, as stated on the transaction receipt
  • Properly disclose your refund policy for returned or canceled merchandise to the cardholder at the time of the transaction
  • Make sure your transaction receipts show the correct currency
  • Check the cardholder’s card has not expired when they present it for the transaction by visually checking the card.
  • Make a note on your rebuttal if you do not receive merchandise from a cardholder, who claims they have returned merchandise for being defective or not as described
Note: For the US/Canada region, cardholders have to only attempt to return the merchandise.

Do not:

  • Use credit cards to recover funds from previous chargebacks, bad checks, or any other incidents where a financial loss occurs
  • “Fish” for authorization by lowering the amount or altering any of the transaction elements
  • “Key Enter” or call to obtain a “Voice Authorization” after you receive a “Decline” response
  • Make any adjustments to the transaction documentation after the transaction, without consulting the cardholder and obtaining their agreement for any modifications
  • Batch out transactions multiple times
  • Continue to bill the cardholder’s account after you receive a chargeback
  • Force sale a transaction after you receive a “Decline” response
  • Process a transaction more than seven days after you receive a voice authorization
  • Split a transaction into separate smaller amounts to receive authorization, after you receive a “Decline” response.
Note: You can use split-tender only when the cardholder uses multiple payment methods to pay for the transaction.

Additional actions for different merchant types

As well as these best practices, different merchant types can follow additional best practices to avoid chargebacks. For more information about each merchant type, go to the following individual pages:

  • Keyed-Entry or MOTO merchants
  • E-Commerce merchants
  • Retail merchants
  • Recurring billing or service-based merchants
+What can a keyed-entry or MOTO merchant do to avoid chargebacks?

In addition to the best practices described in How can I avoid chargebacks?, keyed-entry or MOTO merchants should follow these additional best practices:

Do:

  • Imprint the front of the credit card on the bottom of the transaction receipt that the cardholder signs
  • Avoid hand-writing the account number on the transaction receipt
Note: You should use a manual imprinter; processors do not consider pencil or crayon rubbings as valid imprints.
  • Use the CVV2 Validation Program for key-entered transactions, in place of an imprint

Do not:

  • Alter the imprint
  • Imprint on the back of the receipt or imprint on a blank transaction receipt
+What can an e-commerce merchant do to avoid chargebacks?

In addition to the best practices described in How can I avoid chargebacks?, e-commerce merchants should follow these additional best practices:

Do:

  • Clearly indicate the expected delivery date on the transaction receipt or invoice
  • Contact the cardholder in writing if the merchandise or service cannot be provided or is delayed
  • Provide a valid customer service number and/or transmit a URL address with the transaction
  • Provide merchandise or services as described to the cardholder
  • In the event the cardholder receives defective merchandise, or they do not receive the merchandise as described; resolve the issue at first contact
  • Ensure merchandise/services match the verbal description for non-face-to-face transactions at the time of purchase
  • Obtain positive AVS and ship merchandise to the confirmed address only (bill-to and ship-to address should match)
  • Participate in the ”Verified by Visa Program” for e-commerce transactions

Do not:

  • Charge the cardholder until the merchandise is shipped
+What can a retail merchant do to avoid chargebacks?

In addition to the best practices described in How can I avoid chargebacks?, retail merchants should follow these additional best practices:

Do:

  • Ensure the cardholder’s card is present
  • Ensure your POS device is in working order and free from dirt and debris
  • Void errors at POS before batching out
  • Obtain a legible, signed, and imprinted transaction receipt if unable to swipe the card. Verify the information on the receipt matches the card
  • Obtain a signature/PIN on all transactions with exception of those that qualify for the “No signature/no Pin” program
  • Educate your staff on the procedures to eliminate POS fraud
  • When running multiple transactions, obtain a magnetic-swipe for each transaction and the cardholder’s signature on each individual transaction receipt
+What can a recurring billing or service-based merchant do to avoid chargebacks?

In addition to the best practices described in How can I avoid chargebacks?, Recurring Billing/Service-Based merchants should follow these additional best practices:

Do:

  • Cancel the recurring billing as soon as the cardholder notifies you of their wish to cancel
  • Make sure billing and cancellation terms are clear in the recurring billing contract
  • Make sure you bill the cardholder for the correct number of installments for the correct amount according to the payment schedule
  • Offer the cardholder the option to cancel, if your internal policies allow

Do not:

  • Bill any installments sooner than agreed with the cardholder
+What does an EMV card look like?

You can identify an EMV card by the gold-plated contact pads on the card. EMV terminals communicate with the chip on the card using these pads.

EMV card

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